North Dalton

North Dalton

North Dalton

1 Comment on North Dalton
North Dalton
Distance: 5½ miles or can be extended to 9 miles
Duration: 1½ hours for shorter version
Level of walk: Easy to Medium on extended versionView Walks Key
 
This walk is also available on the iFootpath website and App North Dalton Circular
Why you should do this walk…
This walk has been very kindly given to dogwalksyorkshire by David.  When the team has walked this route we will add more detail as per the other walks on the website.What else you need to knowHow to get there – North Dalton is situated on the B1246 road, 9 miles east of Pocklington – following the signs towards Driffield and Bridlington. From the east, take the A614 road from Driffield and follow the signs towards North Duffield.

Suggested map – OS Explorer 294, Market Weighton & Yorkshire Wolds Central

Car park – roadside parking in North Dalton village

Start – the centre of the village

Length/time – 7½ miles or can be extended to 9 miles, takes around 2½ hours

Terrain/difficulty – EASY, on a mixture of flint tracks and green lanes across fields and by woods; all with lovely views of the Wolds. Dogs can be off-lead most of the time. There is a small amount of road walking on the longer version.

Dog friendliness – there are no stiles and just a few gates to negotiate.

Food and drink – to be confirmed

Public toilets – none

Other interesting information
The picturesque village of North Dalton is situated around the village pond, which has The Star Public House on its south side.

Pretty cottages line the Main Street along with farmhouses and buildings as the B1246 winds its way down, round and onwards through the village. Old properties have been restored and the few new properties being built are all in keeping with this attractive Wolds Village.

All Saint’s Church stands presiding over the village. It has a Norman doorway and the arch between the nave and the chancel also comes from that period. There is a low embattled tower and the most beautiful stained glass window at the west end in which the cross is depicted as a tree, at the west end are three lancet windows.

The Walk

  1. In North Dalton, by the red brick walls of Westwood House, near a telephone box, look for the public bridleway sign along a driveway to Centre House Farm. With farm buildings to the right continue straight ahead towards a large way-marked metal gate.
  2. Pass through the gate and continue onwards along a track, initially with animals grazing on both sides – fenced off, but it maybe an ‘on the lead’ period! The track heads north past the cricket ground and portakabin changing facilities and along chalk, flint terrain for about a mile and-a-half. Pass through another gate with a blue way-marker and stay on the track – avoiding the gap into the field on the right.
  3. The track rises, with open fields on both sides and passes some trees to the left before becoming greener as it drops down alongside a wire-and-post fence. Just after the fence ends, the path turns downhill to the left, angling towards a gate with a blue way-marker. Pass through and immediately turn left through another way-marked gate, on to a green track.
  4. Continue ahead in a westerly direction along the edge of fields through Deep Dale. Follow the blue arrows as the track turns left then right, before heading along the other side of the hedge towards Haywold Farm. Pass a public bridleway junction before walking a short stretch along a concrete path. The path soon becomes green again as it bears left at a gap in the hedge.
  5. Ignore a path to the right and continue ahead to another public bridleway junction. To keep to the shorter route, follow the sign to the left, along a green path with hedges on both sides. The path reaches the road between North Dalton and Huggate, where cars may be parked – some dog-walkers like to start and finish here. Cross the road and following a public bridleway sign, continue along a concrete driveway, past some farm buildings towards Arden Fleets Farm.
  6. After around ¾ mile, turn left following a footpath sign for the Minster Way. This path heads along the edge of fields, alongside hedgerows, back towards North Dalton. At the end of the hedge, follow the yellow way-markers left then right back into the village. A Minster Way public footpath sign points the way past Tithe Farm and the church back to the main road.
  7. Longer Version For those wanting to walk a little further, keep ahead at point 3 for another mile and after passing a small reservoir, take a 90-degree turn to the right, before taking a similar turn to the left and reaching the road between North Dalton and Huggate. Head left along the road (Minster Way) for a short while before following a sign off to the right, along a track which is the continuation of Minster Way – heading south.
  8. Keep to the track as it passes through Blanch Farm and continue onwards to a left turn continuing on the Minster Way. Head east to a concrete path (used on the shorter version of the walk) and take a left and immediate right to continue back to North Dalton, entering the village passing Tithe Farm and the church.

This walk is also available on the iFootpath website and App North Dalton Circular

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Walk Map

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1 Comment

  1. Victoria  - 29/08/2015 - 3:17 pm

    This is a fantastic walk, with really clear instructions! We did the shorter version, which is slightly longer than indicated and took us about 2 1/2 hours. Apart from one livestock field at the very beginning, and another at the end of Point 3, it was all arable farmland and so our dog was off-lead 90% of the time. There are some lovely long stretches and we only saw two other walkers. I think this will become a bit of a go-to weekend walk for us. Also highly recommend the one at Wetwang for a slightly shorter walk.

    • Victoria  - 29/08/2015 - 3:17 pm

      This is a fantastic walk, with really clear instructions! We did the shorter version, which is slightly longer than indicated and took us about 2 1/2 hours. Apart from one livestock field at the very beginning, and another at the end of Point 3, it was all arable farmland and so our dog was off-lead 90% of the time. There are some lovely long stretches and we only saw two other walkers. I think this will become a bit of a go-to weekend walk for us. Also highly recommend the one at Wetwang for a slightly shorter walk.

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Walking on mostly flat terrain, little walking up hill and few styles or dry stone walls to negotiate. Distance from 1 to 5 miles.

Some walking up steep hills over rugged terrain, negotiating dry stone walls. Distance from 3 to 6 miles.

A lot of walking up steep hills over rugged terrain, and some scrambling up rocks. Distance from 6 miles upwards.

An updated version of this walk is available on the iFootpath Android and iOS App. Please visit Get iFootpath

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And the iFootpath Website