Stamford Bridge and the River Derwent

Stamford Bridge and the River Derwent

Stamford Bridge and the River Derwent

14 Comments on Stamford Bridge and the River Derwent

Stamford Bridge and the River Derwent
Distance: 8 miles
Duration: 3 hours
Level of walk: MediumView Walks Key

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Why you should do this walk…

If you want to give your dog a good long walk with a lot of off-lead time and an opportunity to have a swim or paddle in the river along the way.  This is an easy to follow route on flat terrain through pretty open countryside, with the return leg closely following the River Derwent.

What else you need to know

How to get there – Stamford Bridge is on the A166 York to Bridlington road. By public transport, take the No.10 bus from York City Centre – half hourly service (hourly on Sunday) operated by First York or the No.747 from York to Pocklington via Stamford Bridge operated by East Yorkshire Motor Services – limited service.

Suggested map – OS Explorer 294 Market Weighton & Yorkshire Wolds Central

Car park – Pay and Display, by the road bridge near the river in Stamford Bridge

Start – in the car park, next to the river

Length/time – 8 miles, takes around 2¾-3 hours

Terrain/difficulty – MEDIUM, with no climbing on mostly good clear paths and bridleways by the river. The road sections are easy through a quiet village; the short section by the A1079 has a separate path.

Dog friendliness – the outward leg is mainly on enclosed paths, which allow for plenty of romping off-lead. On the way back by the river, there are several footbridges and stiles with nearly all of them incorporating a dog gate. Cattle may be encountered from time to time, so keep your dog under control and you may see some traffic in Low Catton (one car passed us!)

Food and drink – The Bayhorse in Stamford Bridge in dog-friendly

Public toilets – in Stamford Bridge

Other interesting info:

The Battle of Stamford Bridge 1066 marked the end of the Vikings in Britain.

The Walk

  1. At the entrance to the car park, follow a public footpath sign for Low Catton (1½ miles). Pass through a kissing gate and on to a clear path by the river, heading towards the old railway viaduct. There are romping opportunities all around at this point in the wide spaces alongside the path. Keep ahead underneath the old railway line along the river bank.
  2. Cross a wooden footbridge and pass through a kissing gate into a field – look out for cattle and be prepared to keep your pooch under close control. Head diagonally across a field with trees in it to another kissing gate, leading to another field. Continue on the path as it heads away from the river alongside a wire and post fence to the right and bushes to the left.
  3. Re-entering more open ground, pass over a little wooden footbridge as the path continues with a field to the left and trees to the right. Keeping ahead, the path becomes enclosed again and eventually bears left then right, following the perimeter of Rectory Farm. Head towards a kissing gate, which leads onto the quiet road entering the village of Low Catton.
  4. Passing the Old Rectory to the right, continue ahead through this pretty village, with views of the Yorkshire Wolds and open fields. At Town End farm where the road bears left, keep ahead using a public bridleway cutting between two fields. At a waymarked bridleway gate, keep left alongside the tree line. Pass through another waymarked gate and continue basically ahead, with a hedge now to the right. The path leads to the A1079 road.
  5. Pass through a gate and turn right for a short distance alongside the road. Immediately after passing over the river, turn right at a waymarked footpath sign for Jorvick Way and Minster Way – next to the large East Riding of Yorkshire sign. Step over the metal barrier – your dog will go under, and follow the path down towards the river bank.
  6. The path now closely follows the river all the way back to Stamford Bridge. There are numerous little footbridges and stiles to negotiate most of which have dog gates. Most dogs will simply go under the fences!  Some of the fields may hold cattle, but all offer lovely views of the River Derwent and there are opportunities for your pooch to have a paddle or a swim as the bank slopes to the water’s edge in places. Romping opportunities are in abundance!
  7. The site of the railway viaduct signals the end of the walk. Follow the path back to Stamford Bridge, up to the road bridge over the river. Cross the road and use the footbridge to cross the river back to the car park on the entrance to Stamford Bridge.

The Gallery

Walk Map

 

Related Posts

14 Comments

  1. lottie  - 13/05/2012 - 2:07 pm

    Good walk. Virtually all off lead . Hardly saw anyone. Gps clocked it slightly shorter at 7 miles.
    ( car Park in stamford bridge was free)

  2. Wilsonsde  - 03/06/2012 - 3:49 pm

    A great walk, but some sections are very overgrown at the moment, it was a wet day so waterproofs were a must on a drier day long trousers are advised as there are lots of nettles. The fields on the final leg following the Derwent are deeply rutted from cattle and can make it difficult walking. Some of the dog gates are very small so be prepared to lift your larger dogs over them. All in all great off lead time with lots of space to run, our 6 month old Lab loved it.

  3. Helen  - 21/08/2012 - 5:21 pm

    Walked 21.8.12. Great walk with plenty off lead stuff. We started at Low Catton. Overgrown in a few places esp on leaving the Hull road to go north again. Dog (Large Munsterlander) managed to go under all dog gates and only had to jump one. Cattle in 2 fields but were not an issue, electric fenced off sheep between LC and Hull Road. 9/10.

  4. Richard  - 28/08/2012 - 10:45 pm

    A very enjoyable and long walk!! My 6 month old cocker spaniel was very tired at the end and so were the children! Our dog had a great time being off the lead so much though. Watch out for the nettles and large amounts of cow muck along the fields on the return leg! Walk recommended

  5. Catherine Reynolds  - 17/02/2013 - 10:11 pm

    Walked 17.2.12. Fantastic walk with plenty of off lead time for our Labrador. Some of the fields were flooded in places so even more fun for our dog running in and out of the water. Downside was that it was a little boggy I places. Will definitely do it again. We only saw 2 other people the hole walk and no cattle so our dog was off her lead nearly all the time. Highly recommend if you have an energetic dog!

    • corina  - 18/02/2013 - 8:21 pm

      Thanks for the review. Really pleased you enjoyed yourselves. It is a great walk if you have a lively dog. The last time we did this walk there were a few cows on the early part of the walk, but after that it was very quiet. Also nice to have a dog-friendly pub along the way too! Happy walking 🙂

  6. LadyS  - 10/06/2013 - 10:36 am

    9/6/13 Lovely walk on a warm sunny evening, and lots of water time for the Labrador. But please note that the cows are not very friendly on the way back round!
    One field had young male cows, who herded behind us and followed us rather closely!
    The next field had females and their calves.

    • corina  - 15/06/2013 - 4:54 pm

      Thanks for the info on this walk. Not had this feedback before and on the times we’ve walked it there have been no cattle in sight. I hope that this is not going to be a regular occurrence. Would be great to get more feedback on this walk for others please.

  7. Christine Booth  - 15/03/2014 - 5:10 pm

    Another fabulous walk again. Didnt pass one other person or any cattle . Molly was off her lead all day. So happy we found this website already planning next weeks walk 🙂

  8. Josh Botterill  - 25/08/2014 - 8:07 pm

    Was really looking forward to this walk went 23/08/2014
    First half of the walk was fine dog.off lead apart from field with sheep in got over the bridge on a1079 to go on the other side of derwent had our picnic at the bottom of river bank then cracked on reading signs of beware of bulls my wife was.worried I said it’s fine there only cows plenty of them.in the first field.next field along we.got 50yards in and we was charged by a dozen cows and a bull we had to run back.the way we came to.to safety of the styles and.bridge so we had to retreat all the way back we came very disappointed I’m sure in winter this would be fantastic but my dog and wife where very scared by this

  9. Mar  - 26/08/2014 - 8:43 am

    It has been a great walk. Both Pie and I enjoyed going through Low Catton and the open fields along the river very much. Only a couple of unexpected things happened; Pie got an electric shock from one of those cattle fences (she wasn’t being naughty, in fact I think she was sitting down for me to reward her as she wasn’t barking at the sheep) and the other thing was that in one field the cows were very close to the path and we got chased. However, next time I won’t go on my own, I’m already planning my next visit. By the way, there is also a dog friendly pub (and lovely food) in Low Catton, it’s called the Gold Cup Inn and it gets very busy on a Sunday. It’s a lovely place to have a soup or a drink and carry on with the walk. 😉

  10. Stuart  - 19/04/2015 - 9:40 pm

    Did this walk today (19.04.15). As some previous posts have commented, the cattle (bullocks) on the return leg didn’t like us too much. We past a lady whom turned back because they wouldnt move but we decided to try. We managed to coax them away from the path and slipped past them. We then entered another field with more bullocks. At first they started to move from the path but eventually surrounded us with our backs to the river. It was our first encounter with cattle and Stanley, our corgi; thankfully he behaved and didn’t bark. We eventually back into the previous field. We didn’t want to walk all the way back around as that would been miles, so we did a little field hopping. Naughty, we know. Thankfully that was the last field with cattle.

    Such a shame because the first half of the walk was great. We enjoyed a quick half in the Gold Cup Inn and the village looked lovely.

    If only I read the comments

  11. Stuart  - 19/04/2015 - 9:40 pm

    Did this walk today (19.04.15). As some previous posts have commented, the cattle (bullocks) on the return leg didn’t like us too much. We past a lady whom turned back because they wouldnt move but we decided to try. We managed to coax them away from the path and slipped past them. We then entered another field with more bullocks. At first they started to move from the path but eventually surrounded us with our backs to the river. It was our first encounter with cattle and Stanley, our corgi; thankfully he behaved and didn’t bark. We eventually back into the previous field. We didn’t want to walk all the way back around as that would been miles, so we did a little field hopping. Naughty, we know. Thankfully that was the last field with cattle.

    Such a shame because the first half of the walk was great. We enjoyed a quick half in the Gold Cup Inn and the village looked lovely.

    If only I read the comments

  12. Joanne Roberts  - 03/06/2015 - 6:29 pm

    What a treasure to find this site. We found the location very easy, we thought we would have trouble parking here, as it was May bank holiday. To our surprise we got parked easily and it was free! Lovely walk towards Kexby, once on the otherside of the river, yes there were cows, no bull, they were chasing a couple with three dogs, so we was free to cross the field ok. Second field( which both fields are gated), the cows were at the gate we wanted to be through, They were interested in our dog, they did come running at us, but if you keep your dog close to you and shout at them, they stopped still, just keep shouting at them! The rest of the way was cow free. Really enjoyed the walk definatly do it again.

  13. Hayley  - 17/06/2015 - 4:21 pm

    AVOID!!!! First of all, some of the path just after the turning off the A1079 was seriously overgrown with nettles, could barely see the path. Then the cows! OMG I have never been so scared in all my life that I might actually be seriously injured at the very least (A friend of mine’s mother was killed by stampeding cows). A herd charged at us through one field, we barely got to the gate (contemplated jumping in the river for a second). Then trying to get through a gate further on another herd charged again. These were all bullocks, clearly aggressive and even charged the fence. We decided not to go through that field but not wanting to go back through the first one were forced to scrabble through a barbed wire fence (ripping my jeans and terrifying the dog as we pushed her under it) and trespass on farmers land up to a farmhouse so that we could meet the road and walk back to the car via Helmsley. The pub that was dog friendly didn’t serve food. Although to be fair, alcohol is what was needed by this point.

  14. Hayley  - 17/06/2015 - 4:21 pm

    AVOID!!!! First of all, some of the path just after the turning off the A1079 was seriously overgrown with nettles, could barely see the path. Then the cows! OMG I have never been so scared in all my life that I might actually be seriously injured at the very least (A friend of mine’s mother was killed by stampeding cows). A herd charged at us through one field, we barely got to the gate (contemplated jumping in the river for a second). Then trying to get through a gate further on another herd charged again. These were all bullocks, clearly aggressive and even charged the fence. We decided not to go through that field but not wanting to go back through the first one were forced to scrabble through a barbed wire fence (ripping my jeans and terrifying the dog as we pushed her under it) and trespass on farmers land up to a farmhouse so that we could meet the road and walk back to the car via Helmsley. The pub that was dog friendly didn’t serve food. Although to be fair, alcohol is what was needed by this point.

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