North from Howden

North from Howden

North from Howden

6 Comments on North from Howden

North from HowdenNorth from Howden

Distance:6½ miles

Duration:2½ hours

Level of walk:Medium View Walks Key

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Why you should do this walk…

This is a great romp through wide open spaces that lets you and your pooch enjoy a real sense of freedom and tranquillity.  It’s a relatively level route on green paths and along arable fields, where well-behaved dogs can be off-lead for most of the time – and there are no stiles to be climbed.  The bustling market town of Howden and its historic Minster can be seen from the walk.

What else you need to know

How to get there – Howden is on the A63 Selby to Hull road and is also very close to M62, accessed via the A614 from junction 37. By public transport, North Howden station on the Selby to Hull railway line is a short walk from Howden town centre.  Bus services operated by Arriva and East Yorkshire Motor Services from Selby, Goole and Hull stop at Howden.

Suggested map – OS Explorer 291 Goole & Gilderdyke

 

Car park – parking available in Howden

Start – Market Place in Howden

Length/time – 6½ miles,  2½ hours

Terrain/difficulty – EASY/MEDIUM, mostly on flat green paths and through or alongside fields

Dog friendliness – This walk offers plenty of off-lead time for well-behaved dogs.  Dog-waste bins are provided in Howden.

Food and drink – The Minster View Hotel allows dogs in the bar.

Public toilets – facilities in Howden

Other interesting info:

The terrain around Howden is largely flatland and in some places marshland, much of which is divided by drainage dykes, which are used as markers and guides along the walk.

One of the earliest recorded events in Howden’s past is that King Edgar of England gave Howden Manor to his first wife, Ethelfleda, in 959 AD. Howden’s impressive Minster is well worth a visit. Construction began in 1228, but it was not completed until the 15th century when the chapter house and top of the tower was added.

In the 14th and 15th centuries, Howden became a centre for pilgrims because of John of Howden’s alleged miracles in the 13th century!

The Walk

  1. Start at the war memorial in Howden market place, and head along Market Place passing the White Horse pub before turning right at the end of the road in to Bridgegate. After passing the white stone Press Association building, turn left along a road signposted for the Oaks Golf Club & Spa and Bubwith. Continue ahead along a wide pedestrian path, passing some new-build houses to the left.
  2. Just before the 40 miles per-hour signs, turn left down a track which leads to a path next to a dyke.  The path is partly enclosed by trees, and is flat and easy to follow. Ignore a path to the right over the dyke, and bear left past a wooden way-marker post – for the Howden 20 trail. The path crosses a tiny wooden plank footbridge as the views begin to open up. Where the path meets another, cross a wooden footbridge following the Howden 20 trail sign, and then turn left before continuing ahead towards a farm with the dyke to the left and fields to the right.
  3. Since leaving Howden, Izzy has been constantly off the lead. Just after the path crosses another dyke, turn right and walk alongside this dyke keeping it to the right. After a short while, turn 90-degrees left at a way-marker post and head towards another marker post just inside a gap in the Hawthorne hedge ahead.
  4. Keep following the Howden 20 signs along the wide, green path – ideal romping ground for Pooch! With a field and the farm buildings seen earlier to the left, and a Hawthorne hedge to the right, continue ahead towards the tree-line. Where the path crosses a farm track, continue ahead on the path towards the trees, following a broken public footpath sign tied to a stone bollard. On reaching the trees – near a junction of paths, follow a way-marker and the Howden 20 sign to the right of a wooden gate, and to the left of a metal gate towards an enclosed footpath. In this area, dogs should be kept on the lead due to presence of ground nesting birds. Follow the way-marker to the right then turn left over a wooden footbridge into an open field.
  5. Continue straight ahead, following the hedge-line on a clear path along the edge of the field to a wooden footpath sign next to the railway line, by a level crossing. At this point the Howden 20 route path crosses the railway line. Turn left and head along the wide, green farm track that runs up to the level crossing – with the cooling towers of Drax power station visible straight ahead in the distance. By a raised mound of land, bear right on to grassier path and head in the direction of a farm.
  6. At an old way-marker post near the end of a dyke, turn left and walk alongside the dyke – keeping it to the right. Keep ahead then follow the tree-line along the edge of the field – passing a white and red gas pipe marker post to the right. Soon after, turn left along a green path cut into the field towards another old marker post in front of the trees. Continue on the path as it heads back towards the footbridge crossed earlier.
  7. After re-crossing the footbridge head along the enclosed path, once again on the Howden 20 trail – and making sure dogs are on leads in the ground-nesting bird area. Having returned to the junction of paths, retrace the outward route back towards Howden and continue straight ahead along the track. Howden Minster is visible in the distance ahead. After passing the farm buildings – to the right this time, continue to the dyke and turn right, then left back to the footbridge crossed early in the walk.
  8. Cross the bridge then continue straight ahead, along a wide, green path by the Howden Marsh Nature Reserve towards houses and trees. At a public footpath sign end of the path, turn left and head along the pavement by the road back in to Howden.

Photo Gallery

Walk Map

 

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6 Comments

  1. Rebecca Hunter  - 02/06/2013 - 2:43 pm
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    We’ve just returned home after completing this walk today, and the weather was perfect for it! Despite being from nearby Goole, I’d never come across this walk before, and we thoroughly enjoyed it. It was very peaceful, and we saw (and heard) a great deal of wildlife. (Our dog, Lotty, enjoyed herself too!)

    The directions for the walk were very clear and easy to follow. Thank you very much for sharing.

    • corina  - 02/06/2013 - 8:35 pm
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      Thanks – yours is the first comment on this walk. Really pleased you liked it. We thought it was a bit of a gem really and hadn’t explored the area until we did this walk. 🙂

  2. Christine Booth  - 01/03/2014 - 3:42 pm
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    Thoroughly enjoyed this today. Perfect sunny day with a crisp air saw 3 deer and no other person or dog. Took us approx. 2.5 hours and we sat in Market Square after with sandwiches will definitely be looking at these more often. Directions were crystal clear.
    Thankyou

  3. Bryan  - 02/04/2014 - 2:58 pm
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    Just done this walk or at least something that resembled it. We got as far as step 5 and reached the railway line. From there we got confused with the instructions and didn’t know whether to cross the railway line or not. Instead we followed the line up to the left and reached a road. From there we couldn’t figure out where to go so turned back. An idea on where we went wrong would be nice and also suggest clarifying it in the guide. Other than that was a nice walk. Thank you.

  4. Carrie, Gareth and Peanut  - 02/03/2015 - 5:09 pm
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    We are new to this site and have tried a couple of the walks. I was particularly impressed with this one as even on a Saturday morning, the whole time it took we only saw one other couple with their dog so it was great to be able to let Peanut off his lead and not have to worry about him getting distracted! We followed the route exactly with no problems and found that it took the time indicated. The start was quite muddy but it soon opened out and there are lots of wide open spaces so you can see in all directions, useful with a boisterous puppy who, though good off the lead when it’s quiet, can’t resist running off to play with other dogs whether they like it or not. I imagine it would be busier in the summer but a great local walk for us and one we’ll be using again.

  5. Carrie, Gareth and Peanut  - 02/03/2015 - 5:09 pm
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    We are new to this site and have tried a couple of the walks. I was particularly impressed with this one as even on a Saturday morning, the whole time it took we only saw one other couple with their dog so it was great to be able to let Peanut off his lead and not have to worry about him getting distracted! We followed the route exactly with no problems and found that it took the time indicated. The start was quite muddy but it soon opened out and there are lots of wide open spaces so you can see in all directions, useful with a boisterous puppy who, though good off the lead when it’s quiet, can’t resist running off to play with other dogs whether they like it or not. I imagine it would be busier in the summer but a great local walk for us and one we’ll be using again.

  6. Yvonne Moir  - 26/10/2015 - 2:09 pm
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    Did this walk yesterday (25.10.15) beautiful day and really lovely walk up to point 5 where we also went wrong. Think it is slightly confusing as, having gone the wrong way now, we can see you need to follow the track across the field rather than along the edge by the hedge line. If possible would be good to clarify that for those of us who obviously struggle with instructions lol.
    The detour added 4 miles to the route overall and our 12yr old Akita was struggling a bit at the end, our two boys had a ball tho and were off lead for nearly all the walk. As we live in Gilberdyke think this will become a regular for us (following the right path tho!) Thank you for sharing this 🙂

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